Cosmic Suburbia

Date: 
Feb 15 2011 (All day) - Mar 21 2011 (All day)

Cosmic Suburbia

Paintings by Elaine Pawlowicz

Feb 15th - March 21st, 2011

"My suburban community is the inspiration for many of my recent paintings. My neighborhood is a stage set that is distinguished by manicured lawns and curious landscaping. My paintings portray quaint homes swallowed up by neon color fields.  The style is a type of magical realism and the space is flat with an idiosyncratic perspective. In addition to portraits of my neighbors’ homes, I recently completed a 17 foot painting on paper portraying all 29 houses on my street.

I am interested in developing images of Americana. I also am consciously developing my aesthetics inside the history of Outsider Art and Chicago Imagists. I am searching for new ways through composition to tell my stories."          Elaine Pawlowicz

Elaine Pawlowicz (UNT Assistant Professor of Drawing & Painting) received her BFA from Southern Methodist University and moved to Chicago to receive her MFA in Painting from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She continued to live and work as an artist in Chicago for the following 17 years until moving back to Dallas with her husband and two small children ages two and four.  Her work has been exhibited in numerous solo and group shows and her paintings were published in recent editions of New American Paintings for the West and Midwest. In 2005 she completed an installation of 12 large scale paintings commissioned by the City of Chicago for Oriole Park Library. She has been awarded several artist residences by the Ucross Foundation, Wyoming, Montana Artist’s Refuge, and Pouch Cove Foundation, Newfoundland. Elaine has taught college level art for over a decade including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the University of Dayton and currently at the University of North Texas.  Her paintings are speckled with tiny characters that are swallowed up by neon color fields.  The style is a type of magical realism.  The space is flat with an idiosyncratic perspective.  These highly personalized narratives are slightly ambiguous and peculiarly lighthearted.