Waxing and Waning: Parallax Photography Exhibition

Event Date: 
Mar 23 2018 (All day) to Apr 12 2018 (All day)

UNT on the Square exhibition shows off photography students’ work

DENTON (UNT), Texas ¾  When it comes to making portraits, a couple of students at the University of North Texas take a different approach.

Their unique vision will be seenin Waxing and Waning, an exhibition featuring the works of undergraduate and graduate photography students in the Parallax club from the College of Visual Arts and Design. The show runs March 23 (Friday)-April 13 (Friday) at UNT on the Square, 109 N. Elm St. The reception is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. March 26 (Monday).

 Parallax is an organization in which students help each other with demonstrations and critique sessions – skills that will prepare them for their future professional careers as photographers.

While the photography at the exhibition will reflect a variety of themes, the organization’s president, Hudson Ingram, will display his environmental portraiture, which he began after growing tired of conventional portraits. 

His pictures include his grandfather, an electrician, working at this desk and a friend doing dishes in her apartment.

“Growing up, I’ve always been an observer of people – watching people interact in their normal spaces to show how they do things and how I view them,” said Ingram, a senior photography major.

What: Waxing and Waning, an exhibition featuring the works of undergraduate and graduate photography students in the Parallax club from the College of Visual Arts and Design at the University of North Texas.

When: March 23 (Friday)-April 13 (Friday). Reception is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. March 26 (Monday).

Where: UNT on the Square, 109 N. Elm St., on Denton's historic courthouse square.

Hours: 9 a.m. - noon and 1 - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday, with extended hours until 8 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays and 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturdays.

Cost: Free.

Megan Gellner, the organization’s vice president, will also present her portraits, which take an experimental twist. For example, she took 30 pictures of one model and lined the photos together in PhotoShop so they focused on her lips to create a three-face effect. For another piece, the model is still, but with the overlaid photos, it looks like she is in motion. Even though it’s all digital, the pictures have a painterly effect.

Gellner, senior photography major, said the exhibition gives students the experience of preparing a piece for their show. Visitors can also see their creative work.

 “It’s a chance to see new photographers and to really see the breadth and variation of work that UNT students do,” Gellner said.